Mega Hearts Dog and Cat | 3734 SW Moody Avenue | Portland, OR 97239

503/780-0060 | Mia@MegaHeartsDogAndCat.com

"I am excited to make the art and science of humane training and behavior modification available to you and your pet. Treating cats and dogs (and their human guardians) kindly is extremely important to me. I offer in-depth behavior consultations and tailored training programs that can be conducted in my office, in your home, or remotely via phone and video conference. I would love the opportunity to help you and your pet, and I look forward to speaking with you!"

-- Mia Bonadonna, CCS, CPDT-KA

OUR TRAINER

Mia Bonadonna,

CCS, CPDT-KA

Committed to the heart and science of training and  behavior modification

Mia is a professional cat and dog trainer and behavior consultant offering humane, evidence-based support for pet issues using the latest, most effective, positive reinforcement methods. In addition to formal education and training from California State University Los Angeles , University of Edinburgh's Royal Dick School of Veterinary Studies , and Northwest School of Canine Studies , she is certified by the Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers, is a Pet Professional Guild member, and holds certificates in pet first aid from Pet Tech and animal welfare from University of Edinburgh. Mia has previously volunteered with Oregon Humane Society and Pixie Project , is currently serving as a Deputy District Leader for Humane Society of the United States, serves on the Northwest School of Canine Studies Leadership Committee, is a Project Trade member, a Whole Dog Academy trainer partner, and a Regional Coordinator for Shock-Free Coalition. Mia was recently named Volunteer of the Year at One Tail at a Time Portland where she volunteers time as a dog behavior consultant. Mia is partnered with Wildwood Veterinary Clinic where she teaches puppy and kitten kindergarten. She specializes in tough behavior cases such as aggression, fear, anxiety, and unusual behavior.

Graduate, Certificate of Canine Studies, Northwest School of Canine Studies

CCS

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Member of the association for science-based, results-based, force-free professionals, Pet Professionals Guild

Guild Member

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Certified Professional Dog Trainer-Knowledge Assessed, Certification Council for Professional Dog Trainers

CPDT-KA

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Business Pledge Delegate for Shock-Free Coalition

Business pledge delegate

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Master's of Science degree student, Clinical Animal Behavior, University of Edinburgh, Royal Dick School of Veterinary Studies, Scotland

Continuous Learning

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Trade in your aversive training gear via Project Trade

Project trade Member

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Training shouldn't involve pain or intimidatioN for you or your pet

The science is clear: Smoking causes cancer. Greenhouse gas emissions exacerbate climate change. And animal training techniques based on pain and intimidation can create dangerous, suffering pets that may lash out at those around them, often at the worst possible times. 

 

While scholarly research and their own ineptitude have discredited "celebrity" proponents of the sadistic approach to pet training, it's still common to see people advertising their ability to "teach your pet it's place in the pack" or "get quick results through a balanced approach." This pseudo-scientific jargon can sound reasonable, but all too often it simply translates into bullying and frightening your pet; using pain aversion techniques including choke, prong, and shock collars (which you may be pressured to purchase); and even inflicting physical violence. 

 

Like most quick fixes, it doesn't work in the long run and often creates additional, more difficult issues. More importantly, it's just wrong. Your pet is capable of feeling as much pain, fear, and frustration as you are. The bottom line is that only humane, science-based training grounded in positive reinforcement and a respect for the rights and well-being of our animal companions is effective long-term. 

 

You and your pet deserve nothing less. No matter where you turn for help with your pet questions and concerns, please be sure that the people you trust with your pet's welfare are familiar with the emerging science of animal behavior and that they are committed to doing what's right.

 

Learn more about our values